A Social Constructive Study on Optimizing College English Teaching Strategies

Xue JIANG

Abstract


College English teaching plays a significant role in college education, which pays a way for the university students to be more competitive in multinational talent market. Therefore, appropriate and effective college English Teaching strategy applied in the process of college English teaching is considered greatly important. Constructivism which originated and evolved from dissatisfaction of Behaviorist and Cognitivist view of learning and knowledge, posits that learning is a constructive process in which learners build an internal knowledge and a personal interpretation of experience, therefore, knowledge is constructed by individuals or groups as opposed to passively received from the world or authoritative sources. Considering learning process under the perspective of constructivism, college English teachers should adopt some corresponding methods under the guidance of the theory of social constructivism to optimize their teaching strategy. The flexible teaching model, modularized teaching content, perfect teaching assessment system and specialized professional team are advocated to make college English teaching conducted in an effective and positive way.

 


Keywords


Learning theory; College English teaching strategies; Social constructivism

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968%2Fj.sll.1923156320130702.2783

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