Language Outcomes for Preverbal Toddlers with Autism

Erika S. Armstrong, Ariela Jokel

Abstract


Research on late talking toddlers who do not have autism indicates the majority of late talkers will perform within normal limits on comprehensive language measures by the time they reach school age, and toddlers with higher receptive language skills will have better language outcomes. There is little research on school-age outcomes for late-talking toddlers who have autism. The present research investigated 75 children between 2 and 3 years of age who presented with language delays and characteristics of autism. Results indicated the majority (81%) of children with autism use verbal language by the time they reach school age. A subset of 40 of these children who were reported to use verbal language completed language testing. Results revealed that children with better language scores between the ages of 2 and 3 demonstrated better language scores upon follow-up. These findings add to our knowledge of the nature of language use and performance in children with autism.
Key words: Autism; Nonverbal; Language; Preschool; School age; Outcomes

Keywords


Autism; Nonverbal; Language; Preschool; School age; Outcomes

References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968%2Fj.sll.1923156320120403.3528

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