When Individuality Becomes a Plight in Richard Wright’s Black Boy and Albert Camus’ The Stranger

Ghada S. Sasa, Malek K. BenLahcene

Abstract


This paper portrays both Richard Wright's and Albert Camus' depiction, within Black Boy and The Outsider, of man's struggle against their biased societies. More precisely, it sheds light on the state of Meursault and Richard as individuals seeking individuality in the face of their rigid social milieu. Making distinctiveness their main purpose, each protagonist approaches it differently. While Meursault alienates himself, neglects his society, defies it, and dies for his belief in honesty as well as the universal absurdity of the society, Richard decides firmly to leave his racist community, attempts to adapt himself to his society, alienates himself, defies all sorts of authority, uses words and stories to empower him, and heads to the North where he believes he can have a full meaning of selfhood.
Key words: Absurdity; Alienation; The individual; Society; Individuality; Honesty; Racism; Oppression; Struggle

Résumé: Cet article décrit la représentation de Richard Wright et Albert Camus, au sein de Black Boy et The Outsider, la lutte des étre humains contre leurs sociétés biaisée. Plus précisément, il considere l'état de Meursault et Richard en tant que des personnes qui cherchent l'individualité dans de leur milieu social rigide. Considéré la spécificité comme leur but principal, chacun des protagonistes l'approche différemment. Pendant que, Meursault s'aliène, néglige sa société, la défie, et meurt pour preserver son honnêteté, Richard décide fermement de quitter sa communauté raciste, s'adapter artificiellement à sa société, s'alièner, défier toutes les sortes de pouvoir, et se diriger vers le Nord où il croit qu'il peut avoir un sens d' individualité.
Mots-clés: Absurdité; L'aliénation; L'individu; La Société; L'individualité; L'honnêteté; Le Racisme; L'oppression; La Lutte

Keywords


Absurdity; Alienation; The individual; Society; Individuality; Honesty; Racism; Oppression; Struggle; Absurdité; L'aliénation; L'individu; La Société; L'individualité; L'honnêteté; Le Racisme; L'oppression; La Lutte

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968%2Fj.css.1923669720110703.005

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