Research on the Relationship between Positive Emotions, Psychological Capital and Job Burnout in Enterprises’ Employees: Based on the Broaden-and-Build Theory of Positive Emotions

Zhun GONG, Jonathan W. Schooler, Yong WANG, Mingda TAO

Abstract


At present, the research on the positive emotions of employees in management scholars is a little inadequate. This study uses a questionnaire survey to measure 385 employees from Chinese Enterprises, focusing on the relationship between positive emotions and job burnout, and emphatically examines the mediating effect of psychological capital. The results show that positive emotions of employees are positively correlated with psychological capital and negatively correlated with job burnout. Psychological capital plays a complete mediator between positive emotions and job burnout. This study has some guiding significance for the construction of healthy society and organization.

Keywords


Positive emotions; Psychological capital; Job burnout; Mediating effect

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/10383

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