The Effect of Climate Negotiation on Economic Justice in China

Zhen WANG, Scott C. BYRD

Abstract


Nowadays, climate change is an overwhelming threat to many people who live in the planet. As a result, countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and held rounds of negotiations to curb the increasing temperature. Under the principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ in Kyoto Protocol, the responsibilities of developed countries were emphasized. This situation changed in 2007, when China overtook the United States to become the largest emitter of carbon dioxide in the world. China is criticized for being the culprit of the over-emitting carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and is required to shoulder the main responsibility of cutting emissions in post-Kyoto era. However, these blames and requirements are unfair to china and hamper the economic justice of china. This paper is intended to analyze the impact of climate negotiations on economic justice of china from three different aspects: The right to development of China, Emission transfer and China’s export-oriented industry and Injustice China encounters under Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). Key words: Climate negotiation; Economic justice; China; United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; Developed countries; Greenhouse gas emission; Right to development; Export-oriented industry; Clean development mechanism

Keywords


Climate negotiation; Economic justice; China; United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change; Developed countries; Greenhouse gas emission; Right to development; Export-oriented industry; Clean development mechanism

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968%2Fj.sss.1923018420120303.1244

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