Culture and the Childs Right: The Many Ways Most Cultures Abuse the Rights of the Child

Kenneth Ubani

Abstract


Cases of child abuse in modern worlds are becoming alarming. They come in various ways:, dimensions, social or cultural forms. The way most cultures abuse the rights of the child is also becoming apparent. Going by the Child’s Right Protection Act, one observes many instances which is allowed as tradition in the supposedly development of the child. A review of the rules of engagement with the child is vital so that amendments or new rules could apply where necessary in order to adequately and completely protect and prepare the child for a healthy and fruitful future despite challenges of its environment.


Keywords


Child abuse; The rights of the child; Child’s Right Protection Act

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/12007

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