Government and Press Relations in Botswana: Down the Beaten African Track

Letshwiti B. B. Tutwane

Abstract


This paper analyses the manner in which the government treats and regulates the print media in Botswana, especially the public media and argues that this fits within the African context of authoritarian control. It argues that Botswana is not a shining example of democracy in Africa, contrary to popular belief. This is demonstrated through comparative case studies with other African countries. The paper will also address the manner in which the government has treated some of the private publications, notably, Botswana Guardian.


Keywords


Botswana; Colonial; Authoritarian; African

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/%25x

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