Measuring the Impact of the New Brunswick Declaration

Martin Tolich

Abstract


The purpose of the article is to measure the impact of the New Brunswick Declaration.
The results of the study are in three parts: The first part of this article backgrounds the calling for the Ethics Rupture held at the University of New Brunswick in 2012 that produced the New Brunswick Declaration. The body of the article then measures the impact the New Brunswick Declaration has had on the international social science research community in terms of scholarly writing. The article concludes by reaffirming the Declaration as a living document: Its revision will occur at an ethics conference to be held in New Zealand in 2015.
The methods are a google search of any mention of the Declaration.


Keywords


New Brunswick Declaration; Scholarly writing;

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/%25x

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