A Literature Review on Gulliver’s Travels and Its Chinese Translations

Jiachen LIN, Changbao LI

Abstract


Gulliver’s Travels is the masterpiece of Jonathan Swift, one of the greatest British writer in the 18th century. This paper attempts to provide a review of studies on the original work of Gulliver’s Travels and its Chinese translations. It is found that on one hand, most of the previous researches focus on the original work of Gulliver’s Travels covering the artistic features, writing methods and social values of the novel. On the other hand, the researches on Chinese translations of Gulliver’s Travels mainly pay attention to the translation, communication and reception in China, as well as textual studies from several research perspectives.


Keywords


Gulliver’s Travels; Jonathan Swift; Original work; Chinese translations

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3968/11985

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